According to a recent study, a brain-zapping hat helps older people who suffer from short-term memory loss.

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NEW Fox News articles can now be heard on audio! A new study found that persons over 65 who wore a headgear that zapped their brains with electrodes had improved short-term memory.

The technique, in the opinion of the researchers who published the study in the journal Nature Neuroscience on Monday, may be able to reduce the chance of developing dementia and other disorders that cause memory loss. Scientists are enthusiastic about it, but more study is still required before it can be widely used.

150 individuals between the ages of 65 and 88 who had not received a neurological condition diagnosis participated in the study. The participants were zapped with a modest electrical current through the cap while being asked to recall five lists of 20 words. The procedure was carried out over the course of four consecutive days and took 20 minutes.

When compared to the placebo group, which did not receive the treatment, the individuals’ memories improved by almost 50%. The group was able to recall four to six more words than the placebo participants who were of a comparable age, according to the study.

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Researcher's said a cap used to send electrical current to the brain improved short-term memory loss for adults older than 65.

In a statement to NBC News, the study’s author, Dr. Robert Reinhart, stated, “It’s an unpleasant reality of life that as we age, we all become a bit more forgetful. Memory problems affect our ability to plan, make decisions, think clearly, and learn, which can typically have a negative impact on our quality of life.

Both working memory and long-term memory in the people who had their brains shocked improved. The research is still in its early phases, so further research is required to determine how long the advantages might persist.

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Researchers are uncertain as to whether this method can benefit people with severe memory impairments like Alzheimer’s.
According to the CDC, there are over 16 million Americans who have some sort of cognitive impairment, mostly seniors over the age of 65.

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