As a result of the soybean spill, Georgia Creek has seen massive fish kills.

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NEW Fox News articles can now be heard on audio! A soybean spill that happened in July about a mile away from the area caused widespread fish fatalities in a creek in Georgia.

According to a representative of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, more than 100 fish have already perished in Flat Creek, a tributary of Lake Lanier in Hall County, according to information provided to Fox News Digital on Monday, Aug. 22.

The deaths, which have been connected to the presence of soybeans in the water system, were originally revealed last week by neighborhood news affiliate FOX 5 Atlanta.

In an interview with FOX 5 Atlanta, Becca Risser, a headwaters watershed specialist with Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, a nonprofit organization that monitors water quality, stated, “We started noticing the problem with soybeans appearing in the creek, along with discolored water.”

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According to Risser, the bacteria that are decomposing the waterlogged soybeans are “eating up” all of the stream’s dissolved oxygen and lowering it to levels where fish cannot survive.

Researchers working with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division found and sorted dead fish that were discovered around a sewer pipe near Queen City Parkway (Highway 60) in Gainesville, Georgia. This photo was taken on Aug. 12, 2022.

Risser said in a statement made available to Fox News Digital: “Like animals, bacteria use the oxygen present in the water to power their metabolism while they consume the soybeans. Because of this, there is no longer enough oxygen in the water for fish to exist.”

Risser continued, “We have observed dissolved oxygen levels below 1 mg/L near the site of the spill, even though the state requirement for dissolved oxygen in a water body like Flat Creek is 5 milligrams of oxygen per liter of water.”

Rissier told FOX 5 Atlanta that local experts are trying to bubble reoxygenate Flat Creek to aid fish in surviving the soybean presence.
According to the National Hydrography Dataset provided by the United States Geological Survey, Flat Creek is a stream that is about five miles long.
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According to the “Flat Creel Fish Kill Report” from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, on August 12 there were 21 dead bluegill fish, 74 dead mosquitofish, and an undetermined number of dead worms.

According to Risser’s interview with FOX 5 Atlanta, an inquiry into how the soybeans wound up in Flat Creek is currently in progress.

She told FOX 5 Atlanta, “We are aware of a railroad incident that happened upstream of here with three rail cars full of soybeans that tipped over at the headwaters of Flat Creek.

According to a statement given to FOX 5 Atlanta, Norfolk Southern Railway was the firm that delivered the soybeans and encountered a disaster last month.

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According to the railway firm based in Atlanta, “On July 29th, three cars from a Norfolk Southern train derailed in Gainesville, resulting in a spill of soybeans.”

“Norfolk Southern and our contractors were on the scene right once and got to work removing and containing the spilt material. Flat Creek was not affected “Then the statement went on. We learned of soybean stuff in Flat Creek on Friday, August 12, about a mile away from the derailment site.

Three train cars carrying soybeans that belonged to Norfolk Southern Railway derailed on July 29, 2022. The Georgia Environmental Protection Division's Flat Creek Fish Kill Report says fill dirt was used to help equipment access the scene. Damming of nearby water reportedly impeded flow upstream and downstream of the accident.

Regarding the potential for spilled soybeans to be transported from the accident site to Flat Creek by wind or animal disturbance, Fox News Digital contacted Norfolk Southern.

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