Nose picking was always disgusting, but a new study suggests that it may cause Alzheimer’s with late onset.

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It’s possible that nose picking is more than just a bad manners.
According to an Australian study, there may be a connection between nose picking and the beginning of late-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

The research was published in the journal Scientific Reports under the headline “Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect the central nervous system via the olfactory and trigeminal neurons and contributes to Alzheimer’s disease risk.”

It looked at how easily bacteria could enter mice’s brains through their noses.

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The study notes that although Chlamydia pneumoniae is a respiratory tract pathogen, it may also infect the central nervous system (CNS), and that a link between a C. pneumoniae infection in the CNS and the onset of late-onset dementia is “increasingly clear.”

According to the study, mice’s noses and brains were in contact with the germs.

As one of the study’s co-authors stated in a news release issued on October 28, 2022, “We’re the first to show that Chlamydia pneumoniae can move directly up the nose and into the brain where it can trigger off diseases that look like Alzheimer’s disease.”

We observed this in a mouse model, and the evidence may be alarming to humans as well.
Increased peripheral nerve and olfactory bulb infection was seen in mice with wounded and C. pneumoniae-infected noses.
St. John is the director of Griffith University’s Clem Jones Centre for Neurobiology and Stem Cell Research in South East Queensland, Australia.
Researchers stated, “In mice, CNS infection has been found to occur weeks to months after intranasal inoculation.”

But in this study, the researchers demonstrated that the mice’s olfactory bulb, brain, facial nerves, and nose were all infected three days after exposure to the bacteria.

The study noted that between 7 and 28 days after vaccination, “C. pneumoniae infection led in dysregulation of critical pathways involved in Alzheimer’s disease development.”

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The study will be replicated with human participants in order to see if human noses are equivalent entry points for bacterial infection, according to St John.

In the press release, he stated, “We need to conduct this work in humans and validate whether the same pathway functions in the same way.”
It’s unfinished study that has been proposed by a lot of people.
We do know that these germs exist in humans, but we don’t know how they got there, St John continued.

A NEW STUDY SHOWED DEMENTIA SIGNS COULD BE DETECTED NEARLY A DECADE PRIOR TO DIAGNOSIS.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Alzheimer’s is the seventh top cause of mortality for people in the United States and the fifth major cause of death for adults over 65.

According to the CDC, Alzheimer’s disease affects about 6.5 million people in the United States, making it the most widespread kind of dementia in senior citizens.

According to the CDC, there is no known cause of Alzheimer’s disease.

St. John is encouraging people not to pick their noses or pluck their nose hairs in the interim because doing so could harm the interior of the nose and raise the risk of infection of any kind.

In the press release, he stated, “We don’t want to harm the inside of our nose, and picking and plucking can accomplish that.”

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